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Moving around the house and conversely "sticky" connections

I find that when I come in my house my phone grabs the first Eero it sees, typically "LivingRoom".  Then when I go upstairs to my bedroom (with a different Eero) it stays with "LivingRoom" and then runs slow.  I understand there may be a technical challenge with this, but is it supposed to work this way?

Similarly I find my Roku in my bedroom will sometimes connect to the Living Room eero and then not switch back unless I reboot LivingRoom.

We are cord cutting this weekend and need our Roku's and devices to connect to the closest Eero and stay there.  We have 9 Eeros btw.

Advice?

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  • It’s all up to the device to decide when to let go and change, and they are all going to behave differently. There’s nothing eero can do to control that (I mean, there’s technically stuff that can be tried, but it usually causes way more problems then it fixes).

    Like 1
  • I’ll defer to cMoo92 for his expertise on this. I can tell you as an avid user of 4 eeros that my 50+ devices don’t always connect to the nearest eero. Sometimes the signal strength is strong from a distant eero so I suppose the system finds no need to change to a nearer access point. 

    You mentioned some slowness when moving around. Is this for just one device or more than one ?  I find certain spots in the home - mostly anything near the kitchen - get hit with a fair amount of signal loss and even the best routers are battling those spots at times. 

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  • Eero dev explained here

    https://www.reddit.com/r/eero/comments/7o99qo/eero_app_shows_device_connections_to_wrong_eero/ds9b8wq/

     

    I think as long as your device (for instance, my iPhone) is showing full bar on the wifi icon, it didn't matter whether it connects to the bedroom Eero or the Living Room Eero. The whole point of Eero is that you don't have to care/fret over this.

     

    But you mentioned that it run slows.. so that's concerning though.

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  • 9 eeros?  Wow. You should be able to handle NASA from there !  

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  • amissner —

    There is also the chance you have too many eeros in your home. How many square feet is your home, as well as the number of floors and bedrooms?

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      • cotedan87
      • Fan of tinkering with new hardware. Canadian dude.
      • cotedan87
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C.  ... is a question I had too. I’ve got 2 eeros upstairs, 2 down, and am getting a beacon for the kitchen area. Things are pretty good and stable. Is there any measure of when eeros are too close so that anchoring signals gets confusing for the eeros  ?

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  • I'm sure I don't have too many.  My home is about 6000sf, 7 bedrooms.  I have 3 eeros on each floor, fairly far apart.

    That said, I think you answered much of my question already...it is up to the device to decide which is a better connection.  I had wondered if the eeros had anything to do with it, but it makes sense.  I know I had the same kind of issues walking around the floor with my laptop at work (with multiple APs, so the same thing).  So I need to work on getting my device to decide to look for a better connection.

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  • I'm told by Luxul trainers that iOS devices are more reluctant to drop an acquired access point. as cMoo92 says its up to the client device, and not your access point in charge of switching.

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      • amissner
      • amissner
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      PMSyPly Thanks for the heads up. 

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  • “There is also the chance you have too many eeros in your home. How many square feet is your home, as well as the number of floors and bedrooms?”

    Not saying this is incorrect at all, just curious.

    I thought about adding another Beacon because the wi-fi signal at the Beacon farthest from the Eero is much weaker than the closest one, which would seem to make sense. However, my last Beacon (I have two) is only 33ft. from the first Beacon (which is about 33ft. and in line of sight from the Eero) with only 1 wall between the two.

    I already feel like I have enough Beacons and that adding another would seem redundant.

    Im curious if you can actually having too many Beacons. Does anyone know at what point you have too many? And if so, what is happening that would cause problems?

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      • Belfong
      • Belfong
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Mike A you just want to give Eero more money, admit it :)

      I am even thinking of just getting one Eero 2nd gen, as I already have a second gen and 2 Beacons. This will allow me to have a wired Eero upstairs, for the smart TV in the family room.

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  • “you just want to give Eero more money, admit it :)”

    Ok, ok, I admit it! :)

    Simply adding more Beacons ‘seems’ like an easy, though expensive, fix for weak signals or dead areas, but I have a feeling bying a single Eero and then packing every corner of your home full of Beacons is going to be problematic.

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    • Mike A beacons are essentially the same thing as a regular eero, just a little less powerful hardware (than the gen 2 eero that is. It’s actually stronger then a gen 1 eero). The main difference is that since there’s no Ethernet ports, they can’t be used as a gateway. But you could have one eero and 5 eero beacons with no problem.

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