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Feature request: eero needs to support IPv6

eero is way behind.  Google is seeing about 15% of their traffic being IPv6 and the adoption in the US is about 30%.  See:

https://www.google.com/intl/en/ipv6/statistics.html#tab=ipv6-adoption&tab=ipv6-adoption

For example I currently have Comcast at home with native IPv6 support.  I will only buy products that support IPv6.

Bob

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  • Hi everyone —

    Exciting news, IPv6ers!

    IPv6 is now available for all eero networks. To enable IPv6, you will need to be running a minimum of both eeroOS version 3.7 and eero app version 2.14.

    I also just want to take a moment to thank everyone for sharing your interest in this feature, as well as for your patience. 

    For more information, please see this help center article.

    Reply Like 6
      • rmh
      • rmh.1
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C.   I am very pleased to see that eero has released official support for IPv6.  

      In fact, I have been running the IPv6 beta version since early this year.   I have IPv6 from Comcast and it has worked reliably with out any problems since I first installed it.   I am very pleased how well it works.

      Thanks!!!!

      Reply Like 1
      • levigroker
      • levigroker
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. That's great news. Thanks Jeff! Too bad I couldn't use my Eero network and had to send them back. I'm ready to jump back onboard. Any way to get my original discount back?

      Reply Like 1
      • pmenadue
      • pmenadue
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. Thank you to the eero team for listening and implementing IPV6. Look forward to turning it on.

      Reply Like 1
    • Jeff C. Fantastic work to you and the eero team!  It was only eight days ago that we suspected that this would be weeks (or months) away... and here we are with a bona fide release.  The rapid response is very much appreciated, even after a very long information drought.  Kudos!  😸

      Also, thank all of you folks on here for voicing your wants/needs for IPv6 👍

      Reply Like 1
      • mike1234i
      • mike1234i
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. This is great news. However, it appears that if you use Eero plus features, the DNS servers used do not support IPv6. This limits the functionality since the is no IPv6 name resolution.  Does this need to be reported to the development team?

      Reply Like 1
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

       Jeff C.   I'm a Eero plus user as well - interested to hear more about this issue w/DNS servers. 

      Reply Like
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Just went to an IPV6 test site ( http://test-ipv6.com/ ), and received this result:

       

      Your DNS server (possibly run by your ISP) appears to have no access to the IPv6 Internet, or is not configured to use it. This may in the future restrict your ability to reach IPv6-only sites. [more info]

      Reply Like
      • rmh
      • rmh.1
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Danabw When I run the test, I get 10/10.  I am not seeing an eero DNS problem.  See attached.  

      Reply Like
      • kodyaten
      • kodyaten
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. You were so pumped to write this on this thread weren't you? :) 

      Reply Like 1
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      rmh Are you an Eero Plus user? This issue appears to be seen (so far) when Eero Plus is enabled. 

      Reply Like
      • rmh
      • rmh.1
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Danabw I am not using Eero Plus.

      Reply Like
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      rmh Thanks for confirming that you are not using Eero Plus.  Eero Plus uses different DNS servers that don't appear to support IPV6. 

      Reply Like
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

       Jeff C.  Good idea to confirm w/your Dev and QA teams that their testing includes Eero Plus and any other add-on/fee based services you offer. 

      Reply Like
    • Hi everyone — thanks for chiming in and for your questions regarding using IPv6 with eero Plus. Before getting into more details, I wanted to make one thing clear. With eero Plus enabled, you're still able to communicate to the IPv6 Internet. However, because of how eero Plus works, DNS requests are intercepted on your gateway eero and passed to our DNS service. For that reason, we've seen issues with the tests from test-ipv6.com , however, if you try going to ipv6.google.com or searching what is your IP, you will see that IPv6 is indeed working.

      For those who want to take things a step further, you can go into your computer's terminal and do a "dig AAAA google.com" which will also display the IPv6 address that the site is connecting to.

      In all cases, DNS lookups of a domain name do return the IPv6 AAAA record and all subsequent communications do go over the IPv6 internet (assuming available from your provider). The DNS lookup step of a request is unique in the eero Plus case.

      Reply Like 1
      • Danabw
      • Danabw
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. Thanks for clarifying the info here, Jeff, very helpful.  And thanks for helping to make this happen.

      Reply Like
      • mike1234i
      • mike1234i
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. I'm not getting those results.  When I browse to https://ipv6.google.com/, I get

      This site can’t be reached

      ipv6.google.com ’s server IP address could not be found.

       

      • Try running Windows Network Diagnostics.

      DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NXDOMAIN

      I have restarted my network gear and my computers.  I have also tried this from several systems with similar results.

      One item to note is that my eero is not configuring an IPv6 DNS server, but I am getting IPv6 network adapter addresses.

      DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254

      Reply Like 1
    • mike1234i Sorry for the delay! After speaking with some of our engineers, they noted that this seems like there is another upstream router put in front of your eeros. Is that the case in your network?

      Reply Like
      • mike1234i
      • mike1234i
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. I am using Uverse. They only offer routers, not modems — so by definition they route traffic. However, I am passing the public IP though to the eero, so the eero received the public DHCP IP address directly from my ISP. 

      Reply Like
      • mike1234i
      • mike1234i
      • 9 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. I feel bad for not figuring this out sooner. I use a Circle web filter for my kids and I forgot that I left it on for me. Circle operates by intercepting DNS requests and it was obviously interfering with the v6 responses. After disabling my filtering all IPv6 sites are working great. Sorry to sidetrack this discussion. Hopefully someone can learn from my mistake. 

      Reply Like 2
    • mike1234i —

      Ah! Definitely an edge case I didn’t think of. Glad you were able to get it all figured out.

      Reply Like 1
      • gpshead
      • gpshead
      • 11 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Jeff C. Yay! ... now onto the missing features.

      IPv6 incoming connections are blocked (a safe default) with no way to open ports in the firewall for them (bad). It kinda defeats the purpose of IPv6 if you can't allow inbound connections when you _want_ them.

      That appears to be tracked in https://community.eero.com/t/63rn4v/allow-ipv6-machines-to-accept-incoming-connections

      Reply Like
  • Bob, I've also got Comcast, and I've found that Windows 7 and 10 really don't do well at all with IPv6. Most consumer routers don't play well with Comcast's custom IPv6 implementation either. Mac's and other Unix OS computers seem to do well with it, but otherwise it's a bust. 

    It isn't just Eero, EVERY consumer router has problems with IPv6, and that's why it's disabled by default on all of them. And yes, I've confirmed with Google that even their new mesh routers have IPv6 disabled by default until receiving a firmware update early 2017. 

    Reply Like
  • And 90% of IPv6 users in the US are US Military and intelligence services. After 16 years in IT, I'm not impressed at all with how IPv6 has been implemented in the US; it's a bloody mess. 

    Reply Like
  • Check your external IP address; it's probably only an IPv4 address. I confirmed with Comcast that they're using IPv6 for customers within the Comcast network (your modem will show an IPv6 address), but you're actually connecting to internet via an IPv4 address. 

    I confirmed this by rebooting my Motorola MB7420, which is IPv6 certified, and the connecting my computer to it. 

    Even though the router says it has an IPv6 address, as does my computer, checking my laptop external IP address online only shows an IPv4 address, even on every IPv6 testing site. 

    Reply Like
  • Actually that's not accurate - at least for my Comcast experience. I use the last AirPort Extreme and get full IPV6. When I go to http://ip6tools.com/check_client.php , it shows both an IPV4 and IPV6 address, If I got to http://www.ipv6-test.com , I get 19/20 (since Comcast isn't providing reverse DNS). Asking Google at http://ipv6test.google.com gives a green checkmark. And I can visit https://ipv6.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl without any trouble.

    I'd love to switch to eero but there is no way I'm going to go backwards when I have full ipv6 connectivity now. I'll wait, or select a different manufacturer.

    Reply Like 2
  • Penguintopia That my setup and I have similar experience.  

    Reply Like 2
  • Richard1864 I don't think it's true that it's true that most IPv6 users in the US are "US Military and intelligence services".  Google is seeing about 15% of their user access is via IPv6.  That's way more than "US Military and intelligence services" could generate.  It's due to Comcast, Tmobile, etc. using IPv6 for their customers. 

    Reply Like 1
  • I just queried Google on that. I was told the US IPv6 breakdown was:

    83% US Government

    17% iOS devices, as they default to IPv6.  

    9% Android, mostly Nexus and Pixel devices.  All other Android devices default to IPv4

    1% Landline ISP. US ISP's have deployed IPv6 to less than 14% of all civilian customers. 

    Reply Like
  • I agree. IPv6 support is important and Eero needs to implement it. Currently, Time Warner + Apple Airport works perfectly. Time Warner hands a /64 to the Airport and the Airport hands IPv6 addresses to every connected device.

     

    I found it somewhat troubling to receive a response today from Eero support stating that IPv6 support "is not currently on the road map",

    Reply Like 3
  • rcrcr Now THAT is positively scary. At this point, I'm hoping that Orbi (Netgear) will support QOS (as of the last Mac Geek Gab podcast they didn't). If they do, that's probably the correct solution if Eero can't be bothered to implement full IPv6 support.

    Reply Like
  • Agreed, I am having to rethink a slew of recent referrals. I knew that IPv6 was not yet implemented but had no idea that it wasn't even forthcoming.

    Reply Like 1
  • A good source of status for ISP support is:

    http://stats.labs.apnic.net/cgi-bin/v6pop?c=US

    Shows Comcast 64%, AT&T 82%, Cox 33%, Verizon 90%.

    Reply Like
  • For a device that is supposed to be leading edge and so highly reviewed, I was surprised to find out that is eero is not currently capable of supporting IPv6.  It's time to focus on the technology as well as sales!

    Reply Like 2
  • Thanks for chiming in here, NicevilleSteve !

    IPv6 is definitely something we believe in and are actively working on. While we don't have any updates to share at this time, we will be sure to keep everyone in the loop if there are any developments.

    In the meantime, we'd love to hear more about the community's specific needs for IPv6. This includes specific use cases such as LAN vs WAN, whether or not your ISP is dual stack, and anything else that you feel would be important in ensuring the implementation of IPv6 is done to the needs of those wanting it supported.

    Thanks again!

    Reply Like 2
  • Jeff C. I'm already at a point where a good chunk of my traffic is IPv6. I'm on Comcast, and yes they are dual-stack. I guess I can't see the point in taking a step backwards when I have a fully-funcitonal, working IPv6 stack. My AirPort Extreme is working fine at the moment (though I'd love QOS), but I won't compromise on technology by going backwards to something that doesn't fully support IPv6.

    Reply Like 2
  • Jeff C. Comcast and Time warner are good models. Dual stack, DHCPv6 PD on the WAN to get a prefix, SLACC on the LAN. I am happy to come up to SF to talk to engineering staff and product marketing about IPv6. Contact me at bob.hinden@gmail.com. If you do a few searches you will see I have been involved in IPv6 for a while.

    Reply Like 2
  • Jeff C.  – thanks so much for the response on this. A few things:

    (1) an eero support rep did state to me clearly (in writing) that IPv6 wasn't "currently on the roadmap". It sounds like that is incorrect, which I am very glad to hear. However, you might want to correct that assumption with your support staff. Happy to follow up privately with more details of the specific message I received from your staff if that is helpful.

     

    (2) Currently (with eeros in bridge mode) I am personally using dual stack IPv4/IPv6 in a number of scenarios. In all of them, IPv6 addresses are being assigned (by an Apple AirPort Extreme) to all devices on the LAN from a /64 that is being allocated from the residential ISP. These are publicly routable addresses and I do use them for inbound reachability of individual devices on the LAN from the outside world, without the need for any NAT or port forwarding on the IPv6 side of the dual stack.

     

    (3) A higher percentage of residential ISP customers are already receiving IPv6 blocks than I believe has been expressed by some folks earlier on this thread. I can personally attest to Time Warner (now Spectrum) handing /64 blocks to customer gateways in both California and New York, and to Comcast doing the same in Texas.

     

    (4) In my opinion, any Eero implementation of IPv6 should fully implement DHCPv6 allocation of publicly routable WAN addresses to every device on the LAN that requests one. (I could see an optional feature which blocks inbound traffic for those folks who have gotten used to the somewhat incorrect assumption that IPv4 NAT == firewall, but this feature should be _optional_ so that those who want to route inbound WAN traffic directly to devices without NAT can do so without issue.)

     

    (5) Apple has actually done a pretty great job of this with Airport. LAN devices which request IPv6 addresses from the Airport get two IPv6 WAN addresses from the /64 which the ISP gave the Airport. One permanent and one temporary. The temporary address is continually deprecated and cycled on a relatively short lease time. The permanent address does not change. Outbound IPv6 traffic from the LAN device sources from the the temporary address so that user tracking over time is more difficult. However, the device can always be reached inbound at its permanent address, which does not change. I would suggest looking at this implementation if eero is still in the design/planning stages of its own implementation.

     

    Happy to discuss further if any of the above needs clarification, raises questions, or sparks any interest. ;)

    Reply Like 3
  • I currently use an Apple Airport Extreme (ac model) with Webpass in San Francisco.  Full dual-stack, with dhcpv6 for the lan-side /64.

    Lack of IPv6 is the reason why I'm not buying eero gear.  Will be first in line to order once it has full and stable support.

    Reply Like 2
  • Jeff C. 

    Hey Jeff!

    Thanks for the response. My previous ISP was dual-stack for ipv4 and v6. My previous router had good ipv6 support. I found that the v6 network on my isp (Time Warner NYC) performed much better than their v4 network for both latency and throughput. I'm guessing this is mostly due to newer hardware and lower congestion. 

    I do like that ipv6 allows me to directly access my home machines without NAT. I would love to have that same feature on the eero, but in the meantime port forwarding will do.

    Reply Like 1
  • TWC/Spectrum NY customer here.  I agree with others that the v6 performance is really pretty good.  Although IPv6 isn't critical for me, it's definitely being implemented more and more, and I feel like I've gone back in that one case since moving to Eero (though I really like the Eeros in pretty much all other respects...)

    Reply Like 1
  • Jeff C. 

    Reply Like
  • IPv6 on WAN and LAN.  DHCPv6 and SLAAC, Stateless auto-config on the LAN, DNS, etc.  Comcast is fully v6 in my area and uses the standard config. 

    Reply Like 3
  • TWC/Spectrum here uses full ipv6 for the network, would be nice to take advantage of it.  Have ipv6 capable devices on my internal network that I would love to take advantage of too.

    Reply Like 1
  • +1 please add

    Reply Like 1
  • Yeah, this is a major let down. I bought into eero thinking I was getting the top of the line, and now I'm unable to browse the ipv6 web. Very disappointed.

    Reply Like 2
  • I decided to return it. Too many items on the to-do list. May revisit after these requests are fulfilled 

    Reply Like
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